Eugene Marais

The Soul of the Ape & My Friends the Baboons

EUGENE MARAIS


Paperback, Kindle.

Includes the two works by Eugene Marais written after his period spent living among a troop of baboons in the South African veldt.

Firstly, there was a series of articles written in Afrikaans for the newspaper Die Vaderland. They were then published in book form under the title Burgers van die Berge, and were first published in an English translation in 1939 under the title My Friends the Baboons. These pieces were written in a popular vein suitable to a newspaper readership, and were not regarded seriously by Marais himself. They are a journal; a series of anecdotes and impressions.

The Soul of the Ape, which Marais wrote in beautifully clear and precise English, was the more serious scientific document; however after his death in 1936, it could not be found. It was lost for 32 years, and was recovered in 1968, and published the following year.

The excellent introduction by Robert Ardrey that is included in this volume was part of the 1969 and subsequent editions of The Soul of the Ape, and adds greatly to an appreciation of its importance.

“One of the great masterpieces of scientific literature. I would even say it is a master piece of literature alone. I hope this man is remembered by the future and not forgotten further.” – reader review

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Featured

The Wheel of Health

GUY WRENCH


Paperback, Kindle & Epub

“Why not research health, rather than disease?”

The Hunza of northern Pakistan were famous for their extraordinary vitality and health. Dr Wrench argues that in part at least, this is because their food was not made ‘sophisticated’, by the artificial processes typically applied to modern processed food. How these processes affect our food is dealt with in great detail in this book.

The answer that Dr Wrench uncovered in his researches goes deeper than just the food, though. The real answer lies in what was special about the Hunza’s water supply.

A new edition, illustrated.

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Article

On Eugene Marais

by Robert Ardrey. Early in the 20th century Eugène Marais, South African journalist, lawyer, poet and natural scientist, travelled to the wild Northern Transvaal and lived for three years at close quarters with a troop of chacma baboons.The Soul of the Ape is the record of his experiences and observations. Lost for forty years, the manuscript was rediscovered by Robert Ardrey, who dedicated his African Genesis to Marais. Ardrey believed that Marais’ work “presents better than any other book published thus far the dawning of humanity in the psyche of the higher primate.”

The following is Ardrey’s introduction to the original version of The Soul of the Ape. He was an American playwright, screenwriter and science writer perhaps best known for The Territorial Imperative (1966). After a Broadway and Hollywood career, he returned to his academic training in anthropology and the behavioral sciences.

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Article

Link: The Origin of a Revolutionary Theory

Helian.netLink

Eugene Marais was a human community in the person of one man. He was a poet, an advocate, a journalist, a story-teller, a drug addict, a psychologist, a natural scientist. He embraced the pains of many, the visions of the few, and perhaps the burden was too much for one man… As a scientist he was unique, supreme in his time, yet a worker in a science then unborn. – R. Ardrey, The Soul of the Ape (Introduction)

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Article

Gaston Naessens: Somatid and Somatoscope

by Fitzraven Sky

Gaston Naessens’ somatid theory of the origins of cancer, the result of over 40 years of research in bacteriology and biology (the last 20 funded personally by the late David Stewart of the MacDonald-Stewart Foundation), has its roots in the concept of pleomorphism, first advanced by Antoine Bechamp in France in the 1870’s. Pleomorphism is the assumption of multiple forms, or stages, by a single organism during its life cycle. Bechamp postulated such a pleomorphic (literally, shape-changing) micro-organism, which he named “microzymia” as a common progenitor of all bacteria. […]

Article

Royal Rife and Hepatitis

by Ken Welch

On August 19th the New England Journal of Medicine carried an article warning that 2.7 million Americans now carry the Hepatitis-C virus, according to statistics from the CDC. This would make Hepatitis, a potentially fatal disease, the most common blood-borne infection in the country. Globally, the World Health Organization has reported that almost half the world’s population carries one or more of the various hepatitis virus, and fatalities are greater than for HIV. […]

Article

Philippa Uwins and Nanobes

Philippa Uwins and her colleagues at the University of Queensland, noticed strange structures growing on sandstone rock samples they had broken open for studying. This initial discovery was curious enough but when the team found that equipment in their laboratory were being ‘colonised’ by these structures, they realised that whatever they had found was growing. […]

Article

Radio interview transcript: Philippa Uwins and Nanobes

Nanobes are a group of organisms which were discovered growing in some sandstone samples that came from outer western Australia. The interesting thing about the nanobes is that they’re in a size range that’s argued, on a current understanding of biological theory to be too small to exist. And the other interesting aspect of the nanobes is that they’re in the same size range as the controversial Martian nanobe bacteria that were found in a meteorite some years ago. […]

Article

Nanobacteria: surely not figments, but what are they?

Nannobacteria are very small living creatures in the 0.05 to 0.2 micrometer range. They are enormously abundant in minerals and rocks, and probably run most of the earth’s surface chemistry. Although it is conjectured that they form most of the world’s biomass, they remain “biota incognita” to the biological world as their genetic relationships, metabolism, and other characteristics remain to be investigated. […]

Article

To Be or Not to Be? – 150 Years of Hidden Knowledge

by Christopher Bird.

Astounding findings in a field of knowledge that deals with the very smallest forms of life.

Hard as it is to believe, these findings, made over more than a century ago, have been consistently ignored, censored by silence, or suppressed throughout all of that time by ruling “opinion-makers”, orthodox thinkers in mainstream microbiology.

Instead of being welcomed with excitement and open arms, as one would a friend or lover, the amazing discoveries have been received with a hostility unusually only meted out to trespassers or imposters.

To try to present the vastness of a multi-dimensional panorama, is a little like trying to inscribe the contents of thick manuscript onto a postage stamp, or reduce the production of an hour-long drama into a few minutes of stage time. […]

Article

Geological Micro-leavens

In this account of one of his experiments which demonstrates the existence of microzymas, Bechamp added chalk to maintain the neutrality of the medium. He was surprised to see two different reactions, depending on whether he used chemically pure calcium carbonate or commercial chalk, all other factors being equal.

The first solution, with sugar added and treated with creosote, did not ferment.

The second solution, under the same conditions, fermented.

On microscopic examination of the commercial chalk, Bechamp invariably found the “little bodies” observed in his previous experiments. “They are organized and living”, they act like moulds, they are agents of fermentation — they are ‘micro-leavens’. […]

Article

Pasteur: Plagiarist, Imposter

by Robert Pearson

Introduction to Bechamp or Pasteur?

Pearson’s book, originally published in the 1940’s, is an excellent introduction to the theory and practice of Pasteur’s ‘science’, his inability to fully understand the concepts he was appropriating, and the consequences of the vaccines that he and his followers created.

Louis Pasteur built his reputation and altered the course of twentieth century science by plagiarizing and distorting the work Antoine Bechamp.

Pearson exposes facts concerning Pasteur which are still being ignored today, and provides a detailed historical background to the current controversy surrounding vaccination. Even during Pasteur’s lifetime, there were people who could see how wrong he was, and that he knew he was wrong. […]

DL Major

Air for Fire

DL MAJOR


Paperback, Kindle & epub

A collection of nine short stories and miscellaneous poems by David Major, author of The Day of the Nefilim. While the Nefilim was a meandering trip through some of the world’s great conspiracy theories, Air for Fire is a collection of short tales that happen in every timeline but this one. Shameless historical revisionism.

Air for Fire • The Princess Aslauga • The Tower • Berthezene • The One a Dog Runs To • All That The Thunderer Wrung From Thee • Rhakotis • Feeding the Beast • The Serpent & the Horse
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Article

Mechanical and Electrical Responses in Living Matter

The first two chapters of Bose’s ‘Response in the Living and Non-living’.

 Reaction under stimulus is seen even in the lowest organisms; in some of the amœboid rhizopods, for instance. These lumpy protoplasmic bodies, usually elongated while creeping, if mechanically jarred, contract into a spherical form.

If, instead of mechanical  disturbance, we apply salt solution, they again contract, in the same way as before. Similar effects are produced by sudden illumination, or by rise of temperature, or by electric shock.

A living substance may thus be put into an excitatory state by either mechanical, chemical, thermal, electrical, or light stimulus. Not only does the point stimulated show the effect of stimulus, but that effect may sometimes be conducted even to a considerable distance. […]

Article

Wheat grows and corn ripens, though all the banks in the world may break…

The first two chapters of ‘Ten Acres is Enough’, by Edmund Morris.

The man who feeds his cattle on a thousand hills may possibly see the title of this little volume paraded through the newspapers; but the chances are that he will never think it worthwhile to look into the volume itself. The owner of a hundred acres will scarcely step out of his way to purchase or to borrow it, while the lord of every smaller farm will be sure it is not intended for him.

Few persons belonging to these various classes have been educated to believe that ten acres are enough. Born to greater ambition, they have aimed higher and grasped at more, sometimes wisely, sometimes not. Many of these are now owning or cultivating more land than their heads or purses enable them to manage properly. Had their ambition been moderate and their ideas more practical, their labor would be better rewarded, and this book, without doubt, would have found more readers. […]

Article

Bechamp’s preface to ‘The Blood and its Third Element’

Bechamp’s preface to ‘The Blood and its Third Element’.

This work upon the blood is the crown to a collection of works upon ferments and fermentation, spontaneous generation, albuminoid substances, organization, physiology and general pathology which I have pursued without relaxation since 1854, at the same time with other researches of pure chemistry more or less directly related to them, and, it must be added, in the midst of a thousand difficulties raised up by relentless opponents from all sides, especially whence I least expected them.

To solve some very delicate problems I had to create new methods of research and of physiological, chemical and anatomical analysis. Ever since 1857 these researches have been directed by a precise design to a determined end: the enunciation of a new doctrine regarding organization and life.

It led to the microzymian theory of the living organization, which has led to the discovery of the true nature of blood by that of its third anatomical element, and, at last, to a rational, natural explanation of the phenomenon called its spontaneous coagulation. […]

Article

The Magnifying Transmitter

By Nikola Tesla. “If my memory serves me right, it was in November, 1890, that I performed a laboratory experiment which was one of the most extraordinary and spectacular ever recorded in the annals of science. In investigating the behavior of high frequency currents, I had satisfied myself that an electric field of sufficient intensity could be produced in a room and used to light up electrodeless vacuum tubes…” […]

Article

The Problem of Increasing Human Energy

The introduction to Tesla’s book ‘The Problem of Increasing Human Energy’.

“Of all the endless variety of phenomena which nature presents to our senses, there is none that fills our minds with greater wonder than that inconceivably complex movement which we designate as human life.

Its mysterious origin is veiled in the forever impenetrable mist of the past, its character is rendered incomprehensible by its infinite intricacy, and its destination is hidden in the unfathomable depths of the future.

From where does it come? What is it? Where is it going? These are the great questions which the sages of all times have endeavored to answer.” […]

Article

Bacteria are microzymas

Alan Cantwell


Article

A century and a half ago, Antoine Bechamp declared the microzyma is the essential unit of life. He observed tiny, round granular bodies within the cells that glistened as tiny sparkles of refracted light. He was not the first to see the granules, but he was the first to suspect these ‘little bodies’ might hold the key to the origin of life.

Bechamp taught that all life arises from microzymas. After many laboratory experiments and microscopic examinations, he claimed that microzymas were capable of developing into common living organisms that go by the name of bacteria. Some of these intermediate bacterial stages were regarded by experts as different species, but to Bechamp they were all related and derived from microzymas. […]