Albert Howard

An Agricultural Testament

ALBERT HOWARD


Paperback

“Howard’s discoveries and methods, and their implications, are given in detail in An Agricultural Testament. They are of enormous usefulness to gardeners and farmers, and to anyone who may be interested in the history and the problems of land use.

But aside from its practical worth, Howard’s book is valuable for his ability to place his facts and insights within the perspective of history. This book is a critique of civilizations, judging them not by their artefacts and victories, but by their response to the sacred duty of handing over to the next generation, unimpaired, the heritage of a fertile soil.” – Wendell Berry, The Last Whole Earth Catalog

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Articles and extracts

Edible wild plants

Includes: Buckwheat • Cat’s Ears • Chickweed • Chicory • Cleavers • Clover • Common mallow • Dandelion • Dock • Milk Thistle • Wood sorrel • Plantain • Purslane • Sheperd’s Purse • Sow Thistle • Stinging Nettle • Violet […]

Albert Howard

The Soil and Health

ALBERT HOWARD


Paperback, Kindle, Epub.

A new edition of an important work by Albert Howard, one of the leading figures of the British organics movement.

This is a detailed analysis of the vital role of humus and compost in soil health — and the importance of soil health to the health of crops and the humans who eat them. The author is keenly aware of the dead end which awaits humanity if we insist on growing our food using artificial fertilisers and poisons.

“Agriculture is the fundamental industry of the world and must be allowed to occupy the primary position in the economies of all countries.” – Albert Howard

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Articles and extracts

Wheat grows and corn ripens, though all the banks in the world may break…

Edmund Morris


The first two chapters of ‘Ten Acres is Enough’.

THE MAN WHO FEEDS his cattle on a thousand hills may possibly see the title of this little volume paraded through the newspapers; but the chances are that he will never think it worthwhile to look into the volume itself. The owner of a hundred acres will scarcely step out of his way to purchase or to borrow it, while the lord of every smaller farm will be sure it is not intended for him.

Few persons belonging to these various classes have been educated to believe that ten acres are enough. Born to greater ambition, they have aimed higher and grasped at more, sometimes wisely, sometimes not. Many of these are now owning or cultivating more land than their heads or purses enable them to manage properly. Had their ambition been moderate and their ideas more practical, their labor would be better rewarded, and this book, without doubt, would have found more readers. […]

Book

Ten Acres is Enough

EDMUND MORRIS


Paperback, Kindle, epub.

“Recently we have seen a great back-to-the-land movement, with many young professional people returning to small scale farming; thus it is great fun to read about someone who did exactly the same thing in 1864. In that year, Mr. Edmund Morris gave up his business and city life for a farm of ten acres, made a go of mixed farming and then wrote a book about it. Mr. Morris proves Abraham Lincoln’s prediction: ‘The greatest fine art of the future will be the making of a comfortable living from a small piece of land’.” – Sally Fallon, The Weston Price Foundation […]

Book

Reconstruction by Way of the Soil

GUY WRENCH


Paperback, Kindle, epub.

Reconstruction by Way of the Soil uses case studies from Ancient Rome, nomadic societies, medieval England, Africa and Egypt, the West Indies, Russia, Australia and the USA to show that nothing is more important and fundamental than the relationship between civilization and the soil. The book takes us through the history of some of the world’s most important civilizations, concentrating on the relationship between humanity and the soil. Guy Wrench shows how farming practices, and the care – or lack of care – with which the soil is treated has brought about both the rise and fall of civilizations. […]

Book

Earthworm

GEORGE OLIVER


Paperback

George Oliver returns the reader to a time and methodology where people took responsibility for what they did and what they produced. In this world of spiraling food prices, huge landfills, diminishing food supplies, loss of topsoil, and water pollution, the reader is gently chastised for “letting someone else do it” and being “just too busy.” We were once a self-reliant nation; now we outsource. Oliver shows the reader what is wrong and why. And the book is about earthworms. […]