Notes

Eugene Marais

Dorris Lessing wrote of Eugene Marais: “He offers a vision of nature as a whole, whose parts obey different time-laws, move in affinities and linkages we could learn to see: parts making wholes on their own level, but seen by our divisive brains as a multitude of individualities, a flock of birds, a species of plant or beast. We are just at the start of an understanding of the heavens as a web of interlocking clocks, all differently set: an understanding that is not intellectual, but woven into experience. Marais brings this thought down into the plain, the hedgerow, the garden.”
Here is a collection of material from various sources related to the South African scientist and poet, Eugen Marais.

Philippa Uwins and Nanobes

Philippa Uwins and her colleagues at the University of Queensland, noticed strange structures growing on sandstone rock samples they had broken open for studying. This initial discovery was curious enough but when the team found that equipment in their laboratory were being ‘colonised’ by these structures, they realised that whatever they had found was growing.

‘The Day of the Nefilim’ – Excerpt

D. Major


Excerpt: The Day of the Nefilim

The sun darkens. At first imperceptibly, and then with greater speed, it casts an unfamiliar veil over itself. It is the first eclipse in years.

The people look up at the sky, where some of them notice to the east a star falling to its death, and others watch the hulking disk of the moon that obscures the sun. It was all there in the sky that day, above Barker’s Mill.

After a few minutes, the eclipse is over. The planets creak slowly along their orbits, and soon everything is as it was.